Best Kind

By Robert Finley

Best Kind
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In Best Kind, editor and essayist Robert Finley introduces twelve of the most exciting essay writers currently working in Newfoundland. Highlighting a varied and electrifying range of new voices, this groundbreaking anthology presents the first generation of island writers to ... Read more


Overview

In Best Kind, editor and essayist Robert Finley introduces twelve of the most exciting essay writers currently working in Newfoundland. Highlighting a varied and electrifying range of new voices, this groundbreaking anthology presents the first generation of island writers to actively and consistently engage in the burgeoning field of creative nonfiction, blazing a trail into newfound territory.

Robert Finley

Robert Finley is coordinator of Memorial University's Creative Writing Diploma Program where he teaches literature and creative nonfiction. His books, translations and collaborations include The Accidental Indies, A Ragged Pen, and K.L.Reich.

Awards

  • Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards 2018, Short-listed

Reviews

“Michelle Porter and Bridget Canning, in two of the strongest entries in the book, make it clear that they are aware of how memory shapes story… This is especially effective in Porter’s case, as her sisterly tale of narrowly avoiding sexual molestation as children is repeatedly framed by time and memory. It’s a true story, but it’s also a gothic story, one in which Porter doesn’t realize she was the hero until she’s an adult, in the frame narrative, talking on the phone to the sister she saved. That frame provides a pleasing irony: the helpless female heroines of the British gothic were always repeatedly framed in narratives meant to lend verisimilitude to the story of barely thwarted rape by cruel aristocratic Catholic uncles.   Porter’s true story of the neighbourhood pervert provides a similar frame but conveys its reality via subjective judgment rather than locating it in the fixed text of the dusty, lost manuscript of so many gothic and horror tales… The writing [in Best Kind] is strong and consistent throughout, and the book reads briskly… These are some good stories, stories that make us think about how stories — fiction and non-fiction alike — depend on the mind and the tongue of the teller. ”

Nathan R. Elliott

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