ebooks for Everyone Lists

Browse featured titles from the ebooks for Everyone collection of accessible epubs.

Browse by Category

  • Award Winners

    Award Winners

    These award-winning titles are now available in accessible ePub format.
  • Back to School

    Back to School

    Set in and around campus, these novels will take you back to school, without all the tests.
  • BIPOC Authors

    BIPOC Authors

    Books by BIPOC authors.
  • Books from the Disability Community

    Books from the Disability Community

    These books explore the experience of members of the disability community.
  • Hockey Books

    Hockey Books

    Canada's favourite season is back – it's Hockey Season! Check out our list of accessible eBooks about the game of Hockey.
  • Indigenous Storytellers

    Indigenous Storytellers

    These books by Indigenous authors are now available in accessible ePub format.
  • LGBTQ+ Stories

    LGBTQ+ Stories

    Books for our LGBTQ+ community.
  • Teen Reads

    Teen Reads

    Accessible eBooks for Young Adults, or Adults that are young at heart.

All Books in this Collection

Showing 61–80 of 528 results

  • Black and Blue

    Black and Blue

    $21.95

    Author and radio personality Stanley Péan is a jazz scholar who takes us seamlessly and knowledgeably through the history of the music, stopping at a number of high points along the way. He gets behind the scenes with anecdotes that tell much about the misunderstandings that have surrounded the music. How could French existentialist writer Jean-Paul Sartre have mixed up Afro-Canadian songwriter Shelton Brooks with the Jewish-American belter Sophie Tucker? What is the real story behind the searing classic “Strange Fruit” made immortal by Billie Holiday, who at first balked at performing it? Who knew that an Ohio housewife named Sadie Vimmerstedt was behind the revenge song “I wanna be around to pick up the pieces when somebody breaks your heart?” And since this is jazz, there is no shortage of sad ends: Bix Beiderbecke, Chet Baker, Lee Morgan, to name a few.

    Jazz is liberation music, from Fats Waller to Duke Ellington to John Coltrane who walked side by side with Martin Luther King with his piece “Alabama.” Péan shows how musicians like Miles Davis worked with the emerging voices of hip-hop to widen jazz’s audience. The intricate crisscross between Black musical forms, from Marvin Gaye to the Last Poets is explored, as well as how the movies, Hollywood and European cinema alike, tried to use jazz, often whitening it in the process (with the exception of Spike Lee).

  • Black Dog

    Black Dog

    $17.95

    The Breakfast Club meets Shirley Jackson in a fusion of live theatre and technology that tells a darkly comic but hopeful story of four teenage outsiders struggling with death, depression and the shadow of a black dog.

    Two is fraught. While dealing with the impossible expectations of her parents, she is trying to understand why her brother, a bright and talented teenager, has taken his own life. It’s not until a fateful school detention that she meets three other students who all seem as lost as she is. There’s Three, a quiet, misunderstood guy who doesn’t quite know how to care for himself; Four, the fashionable, popular kid and class clown; and Five, a rebel ready to fight against everyone and everything. Despite their differences, they each grapple with depression and anxiety and become an unlikely source of comfort to one another. As the four unite to battle teachers, parents, therapists and their own demons, their promising futures begin to reveal themselves.

  • Blind Spot

    Blind Spot

    $19.95

    “Some days I wish something truly bad would happen so that I would have something genuine to worry about.”

    When his parents’ car is hit by a train, Luke, a failed actor, returns to his Edmonton hometown to attend their funeral, wrap up their affairs, and prepare their house to be sold off. But while all others around him grieve, Luke remains detached, striking up a relationship with a woman in a neighbouring house … and stumbling across evidence that his mother may have engaged in a longstanding extramarital affair herself.

    In Luke, Laurence Miall has crafted an unforgettable literary antihero, a man disconnected from the pain of those around him, yet blind to his own faults. With his clean, forceful language and a familiarity with the darker corners of the male psyche, Blind Spot is a gripping literary debut.

  • Blue Bear Woman

    Blue Bear Woman

    $22.95

    Blue Bear Woman is the first novel written by an Indigenous woman that was published in Quebec in the French language. The story of a young Cree woman’s search for her roots and identity, Virginia Pesemapeo Bordeleau’s debut novel, Ourse bleue, was originally published in 2007, and is her second novel to be translated into English. The novel explores contemporary Indigenous life and the impact on the Cree of the building of the Eastmain dam in northern Quebec, posited as “virgin” territory, yet which has actually been part of the Cree traditional territory since time immemorial. In search of her roots, Victoria takes a trip to the country of her Cree ancestors with her companion, Daniel. It is a long journey to the north along the shores of James Bay. Colours, smells, and majestic landscapes arouse memories that soon devolve into strange and hauntings dreams at night. In bits and pieces, uncles, aunties, and cousins arrive to tell the story of Victoria’s family and bring with them images of her childhood that are tinged both with joy and sadness. Guided by her totem, the Blue Bear, she returns home to make peace with her soul, as well as release the soul of her Great-Uncle George, a hunter who has been missing in the forest for over twenty years.

  • Blue Sonoma

    Blue Sonoma

    $20.00

    A wise and embodied collection of dreamscapes, sutras and prayer poems from a writer at her peak

    In Blue Sonoma, award-winning poet Jane Munro draws on her well-honed talents to address what Eliot called “the gifts reserved for age.” A beloved partner’s crossing into Alzheimer’s is at the heart of this book, and his “battered blue Sonoma” is an evocation of numerous other crossings: between empirical reportage and meditative apprehension, dreaming and wakefulness, Eastern and Western poetic traditions. Rich in both pathos and sharp shards of insight, Munro’s wisdom here is deeply embedded, shot through with moments of wit and candour. In the tradition of Taoist poets like Wang Wei and Po-Chu-i, her sixth and best book opens a wide poetic space, and renders difficult conditions with the lightest of touches.

    Grey wood twisted tight
    within the framework of the tree Ð
    impossible to snap off,
    forged as it dries.

    And in me, parts I can’t imagine
    myself without Ð silvering.
    ~from “The live arbutus carries dead branches … ”

  • Blue Sunflower Startle

    Blue Sunflower Startle

    $21.95

    A home harbours secrets. Father has cancer. He is dying. Not a word.

    Mother tells me to take care of my little brother.

    In the early 1960s, a young girl and her brother move to their grandparents’ flourmill in Dodoma in newly-independent Tanzania. Her grandfather bellows his love for East Africa, where he and other Indian merchants have thrived. But the ground is shifting. President Nyerere is calling for the widespread nationalization of property. The hum of the mill has quieted. The young girl prays at the jamatkhana (Give me back my father) and spends evenings at the cinema watching cowboy films—grief and grievances, if only momentarily, disappear.

    Hush, not a word.

    Years later, the girl and her family immigrate to Calgary, Alberta and she begins a love affair with the prairies. Wary that her grandfather’s passion for his country consumed him, she is unwilling to settle for geographical monogamy. She travels to Chonju, South Korea to work as a language teacher, and Delhi, India for trysts with her Kashmiri lover. Frequently, she is startled by the appearance of things that remind her of the prairies, but show up in other countries. She aches for a home that beckons her return: the Canadian West, the hero that pulls a U-turn for its beloved.

    Would you come for her, all ribby hair, or slicing the air like a boomerang, hollering at God? Would you strike a wild deal with Him, do anything to get her back?

    Yasmin Ladha offers readers an exquisite exploration of the ways in which one can love a country. Written in unusual, intoxicating, and poetic prose, Blue Sunflower Startle is a modern day Romance for frequent travellers and nomadic spirits.

  • Blueberries and Apricots

    Blueberries and Apricots

    $20.95

    Translated from French by Howard Scott

    In this, her third volume of poetry, this Aboriginal writer from Quebec again confronts the loss of her landscape and language.

    On my left hip
    a face

    I walk
    I walk upright
    like a shadow

    a people on my hip
    a boatload of fruit
    and the dream inside
    women and children first

    “A cry rises in me and transfigures me. The world waits for woman to come back as she was born: woman standing, woman powerful, woman resurgent. A call rises in me and I’ve decided to say yes to my birth.”

  • Bodymap

    Bodymap

    $20.95

    Finalist for the Triangle Awards, Audre Lorde Award for Lesbian Poetry, 2015
    Shortlisted for the ReLit Award, Poetry, 2016

    In Bodymap, Lambda Award-winner Leah Lakshmi Piepzna-Samarasinha sings a queer disabled femme-of-colour love song filled with hard femme poetics and disability justice. In this volume, Leah Lakshmi maps hard and vulnerable terrains of queer desire, survivorhood, transformative love, sick and disabled queer genius and all the homes we claim and deserve.

  • Bon: The Last Highway

    Bon: The Last Highway

    $22.95

    The death of Bon Scott is the Da Vinci Code of rockIn death, AC/DC’s trailblazing frontman has become a rock icon, and the legend of the man known around the world simply as “Bon” grows with each passing year. But how much of it is myth?At the heart of Bon: The Last Highway is a special — and unlikely — friendship between an Australian rock star and an alcoholic Texan troublemaker. Jesse Fink, author of the critically acclaimed international bestseller The Youngs: The Brothers Who Built AC/DC, reveals its importance for the first time.Leaving no stone unturned in a three-year journey that begins in Austin and ends in London, Fink takes the reader back to a legendary era for music that saw the relentless AC/DC machine achieve its commercial breakthrough but also threaten to come apart. With unprecedented access to Bon’s lovers, newly unearthed documents, and a trove of never-before-seen photos, Fink divulges startling new information about Bon’s last hours to solve the mystery of how he died.Music fans around the world have been waiting for the original, forensic, unflinching, and masterful biography Bon Scott so richly deserves — and now, finally, it’s here.

  • Bone Cage

    Bone Cage

    $16.95

    Jamie is twenty-two years old and works twelve-hour shifts operating a wood processor, clear-cutting for pulp. At the end of each shift, he walks through the destruction he has created looking for injured birds and animals and rescues those he can. Jamie’s desire to escape this world is thwarted by his fear of leaving the place where he has some status.

    Bone Cage examines how young people in rural communities, employed in the destruction of the environment they love, treat the people they love at the end of their shift. Bone Cage is about the difficulty in growing and hanging on to dreams in a world where dreams are seen as impractical or weak. It is funny. It is tragic. It is about different kinds of escaping. It is about a soul trapped in its own rib cage, a cage of bone, a Bone Cage.

  • Border Markers

    Border Markers

    $15.95

    Shortlisted for the Cover Design Award at the 2016 Alberta Book Publishing Awards!

    After the accidental death of a teenaged friend, the Lansing family has split along fault lines previously hidden under a patina of suburban banality. Every family has secrets, but for the Lansings those secrets end up propelling them in different directions away from their border town to foreign shores and to prison.

    Told in thirty-three flash fiction narratives, Border Markers is fractured like the psyches of its characters, all keen edges and tough language. It’s a slice of prairie noir that straddles the line between magical and gritty realism. Jenny Ferguson’s debut is a compelling collection of commonplace tragedies and surprising insights.

  • Bottle Rocket Hearts

    Bottle Rocket Hearts

    $19.95

    Welcome to ’90s Montreal. It’s been five years since the OKA crisis and the sex garage riots; the queers are rioting against assimilation, cocktail AIDS drugs are starting to work, and the city walls on either side of the Main are spray-painted with the words YES or NO. Revolution seems possible to eighteen-year-old Eve, who is pining to get out of her parent’s house in Dorval and find a girl who wants to kiss her back. She meets Della: ten years older, mysterious, defiantly non-monogamous, and an avid separatist. Their explosive beginning and volatile relationship paves a path for the personal and political to collide on the night of the referendum.

  • Bottoms Up

    Bottoms Up

    $21.95

    In 1617, Lord Falkland’s colonists in Newfoundland were instructed to bring, among other things, 20 barrels of caske (ale), 90 bushels of malt, a malt mill, 4500 pounds of hops, 1 firkin of Aqua vitae, 1 firkin of canarie wine, and 1 firkin of methaglyne (mead). And so began the time-honoured tradition of countering the rugged Newfoundland environment with a nip of something stronger. Now, four hundred years later, from our famous kitchen parties to the bars and pubs of George Street, the history of our cultural traditions is intertwined with the history of liquor and beer.

    Bottoms Up is the story of alcohol in Newfoundland and Labrador, and reveals how the drink helped shape so much of the province’s culture. What did Newfoundlanders drink 400 years ago? Where were the most popular drinking establishments of the past? Why does one of our streets have the most pubs per square foot in North America? Distilling four centuries of fact and anecdote, Sheilah Roberts Lukins serves up a revealing and often amusing survey of our fascination with good spirits.

  • Boundary Problems

    Boundary Problems

    $19.95

    In his confident debut, Greg Bechtel offers ten charged stories about the impossible-turned-possible—secrets, paranoia, sex, conspiracies, and magic—our world distilled and transmuted.

    Boundary Problems vibrates on the edge of meaning, as carjackers, accidental gunrunners, small-town cabbies, and confused physics students struggle to wring meaning from the strange events that overtake them. Bechtel’s worlds of mystery, physics, and magic constantly challenge his characters’ pursuit of logical explanations. These compelling tales blur lines and push boundaries—into the surreal, into the playful, into the irresistibility of uncertainty.

  • Brink of Freedom, The

    Brink of Freedom, The

    $22.95

    Every day desperate people at the mercy of smugglers flee conflict zones, crossing the Mediterranean in rickety boats in the hopes of using Greece as the conduit to a better life elsewhere. Thousands perish in the attempt. Those who survive face yet more challenges, for the Greeks themselves, in an economic crisis worse than any in living memory, have neither the resources nor the will to play host to the constant influx of refugees. In The Brink of Freedom we see how worlds collide when a young boy goes missing from a refugee camp in Athens. He is found with a Canadian woman, but the police also apprehend a Gypsy from Ukraine on suspicion of human trafficking. When everyone is desperate, none of the rules of civilized society apply.

  • Broke City

    Broke City

    $18.95

    Broke City, the final book in Wendy McGrath’s Santa Rosa trilogy, follows young Christine as she edges into self-awareness in the now-vanished Edmonton neighbourhood of Santa Rosa.

    Budding with creativity that her working-class parents do not understand, Christine questions her parents’ fraught relationship, with alcoholism and implicit violence bubbling just under the surface of their marriage. Her insight turns beyond her family to her neighbourhood, nicknamed Packingtown, a community built on meat-packing plants and abattoirs, on death.

    Written with tight lyricism, Broke City is a brimming working-class gothic novel that reveals Christine’s deepening knowledge of the adult world around her and of her own complicated place in that world. 

  • Call Is Coming from Inside the House

    Call Is Coming from Inside the House

    $24.95

    From Allyson McOuat, author of the popular 2020 New York Times Modern Love essay “The Ghost Was the Least of Our Problems,” comes her debut essay collection

    In a series of intimate and humorous dispatches, McOuat examines her identity as a queer woman, and as a mother, through the lens of the pop culture moments in the ’80s and ’90s that molded her identity. McOuat stirs the ingredients required to conjure an unsettled spirit: the horrors of pregnancy and motherhood, love and loss, the supernatural, kaleidoscopic sexuality, near-miss experiences, and the unexplained moments in life that leave you haunted.

    Through her own life experiences, various tall tales, urban legends, analysis of horror and thriller films, and spine-chilling true crime incidents, McOuat uncovers how cultural gatekeeping has forced her, as a mother and queer femme woman, to persistently question her own reality. Through this charming and humorous exploration of what moments have made her who she is, McOuat demonstrates for readers a way through by forgiving herself and exorcising her stubborn attachment to a phantom, heteronormative, nuclear family structure.

  • Called by Mother Earth

    Called by Mother Earth

    $24.95

    This raw and intimate memoir takes us inside the mind of a father who embarked on a ten-month journey through rugged and remote terrain in British Columbia in search of his missing son.

    After setting out on a hike on Frosty Mountain on October 10, 2020, twenty-five-year-old Jordan Naterer disappeared. By the time authorities were alerted and the search was underway, the season’s first snow storm arrived at higher elevations, concealing the route he had taken. This memoir follows Jordan’s father, Greg, as he navigates grief, time, and the mountain wilderness of British Columbia on a ten-month journey in search of his missing son. 

    From learning the scope of the logistics involved in a large-scale search-and-rescue effort to experiencing the range of emotions of a determined father and family on an near-impossible quest, the reader will not only follow Greg’s 1,600 km journey on- and off-trail in Manning Park, but will even meet Tmxwulaxw—also called Mother Earth—who guided Naterer throughout.  

  • Capelin Weather

    Capelin Weather

    $9.95

    In this utterly charming picture book, Lori Doody tells the story of Kate, a little girl very eager for the fun of summer to begin, but whose plans for bonfires and picnics are squelched by relentless rain, drizzle, and fog. In simple language and with bright, playful illustrations, Doody captures perfectly the achingly long pause that Newfoundlanders know so well as they await the capelin (small food fish) whose arrival is said to signal the return of summer and good weather to the island’s shores.

    Young listeners will have fun finding capelin, or the creatures that eat them, hidden in some of the illustrations. Capelin Weather is an engaging introduction to Newfoundland for other young readers?with whales, icebergs, and those beautiful silvery capelin that cause such a stir when they arrive on the beaches.A wonderful celebration of Newfoundland weather, for those who live under it and for those who live away. This book will be an instant hit for Newfoundlanders at home and abroad and will resonate with any reader who knows what it’s like to long for summer’s warmth.

  • Career Rookie

    Career Rookie

    $18.95

    A shot of encouragement, a kick in the ass, and a loving push for young people who have no idea what they want or how to get it

    Career Rookie is a book for every grad, student, and 20-something who feels lost, overwhelmed, and anxious. It tackles the emotional and logistical WTF-ness of starting your career, answering questions like, What if I don’t have any experience? What if I went to school for something I hated? What if I have NO IDEA what I actually want? Should I just suck it up and settle? Because, honestly, this career thing is starting to give me an ulcer.

    This fresh, fun guide gives even the most lost and overwhelmed a way forward. It explores passion, curiosity, uncertainty, self-sabotage, and more on the quest to shake off post-graduation paralysis. Finding the right career can seem impossible, but Sarah Vermunt is the fun-loving, straight-talking coach we all need to make feel-good work a reality.