Walking on the Beaches of Temporal Candy

By Christian McPherson

Walking on the Beaches of Temporal Candy
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Over the course of a lifetime, we all experience catch-of-breath moments that stir exquisite awareness of life's transience. Such fleeting moments we share with poet Christian McPherson and his space-suited avatar negotiating bumpy terrain. In this collection the meandering, ... Read more


Overview

Over the course of a lifetime, we all experience catch-of-breath moments that stir exquisite awareness of life's transience. Such fleeting moments we share with poet Christian McPherson and his space-suited avatar negotiating bumpy terrain. In this collection the meandering, often self-deprecating poet considers and records moments of truth and insight common to us all as he registers his joys and regrets, and raises rants in postured outrage. A refreshing and often humorous honesty prevails. As the dedication promises, these poems are for those who go to a job every day but dream of something more. McPherson delivers.

Christian McPherson

Christian McPherson is the author of six books, Cube Squared, My Life in Pictures, The Sun Has Forgotten Where I Live, The Cube People (shortlisted for the 2011 ReLit Awards), Poems that swim from my brain like rats leaving a sinking ship, and Six Ways to Sunday (shortlisted for the 2008 ReLit Awards). He has a degree in philosophy from Carleton University and a computer programming diploma from Algonquin College. He is married to the beautiful Marty Carr. They have two kids, Molly and Henry. They all live together in Ottawa.

Reviews

Christian McPherson is a poet I can count on like few others. He's a disciplined romantic if that's even possible. I've always found his poetry willing to come right up and look you in the eye. First time I read McPherson's poetry I knew it was for me. Candy is exactly that. Sweet and tasty. - Michael Dennis, Today's Book of PoetryChristian McPherson muses in acceptance and chagrin on our small mattering. Thoughts of our jeopardized and perishable lives beset him. In special care he would take the world into his arms: "sometimes I just want more sometimes. " A joyous, wise, and moving collection. - Dennis Cooley

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