send

By Domenico Capilongo

send
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Domenico Capilongo continues to play with lyricism, form and language in his new poetry collection. send is a collection of poetry that explores our many modes of communication from smoke signals to texting. The work uses lyric meditations, personal narratives and experimental ... Read more


Overview

Domenico Capilongo continues to play with lyricism, form and language in his new poetry collection. send is a collection of poetry that explores our many modes of communication from smoke signals to texting. The work uses lyric meditations, personal narratives and experimental poetry to shed light on the ways in which we try to express ourselves.

Domenico Capilongo

Born when rotary telephones came in multiple colours, Domenico Capilongo began writing with pencil and paper, passing poetry notes from the back of the class. He still writes in notebooks, used a typewriter in high school, and his earliest published poems were printed on a dot-matrix printer. His first books of poetry, I thought elvis was Italian (2008) and hold the note (2010), as well as his first book of short fiction, Subtitles (Guernica, 2012), came very close to winning awards and were all mailed in the post. A high school creative writing teacher and karate instructor, he lives with his wife and children in Toronto.

Reviews

Domenico Capilongo's Send bursts at the seams with messages that you need to receive. Contrary to the constantly public display of "texting" by the current POTUS there are texts worth reading, messages worth hearing. Send is full of them.

Today's Book of Poetry

In his latest book, Dom Quixote mounts a new smartphone and tilts away at our digital windmills. His chivalry is analogue: what is lost in our twittering is the seed-bed of his musings. Messages between and underneath communications—tender, sensuous, comically misaligned and/or brutal by turn—are gathered up and offered back to us as rebus: an oracular operating system where what we mean is not always how we speak.

Chris D’Iorio, author of Without Blue

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