Stones, The

By Dennis Cooley

Stones, The
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Stones . . . hewn by nature and the hand of man. They shelter us, record our grief, provide hope, joy and provide a window into the past. Dennis Cooley's latest collection of poetry brings his trademark playfulness and wit to the very foundations of the earth. He stretches his ... Read more


Overview

Stones . . . hewn by nature and the hand of man. They shelter us, record our grief, provide hope, joy and provide a window into the past. Dennis Cooley's latest collection of poetry brings his trademark playfulness and wit to the very foundations of the earth. He stretches his prairie eyes far across the ocean to the cathedrals and monuments of Europe and connects our curling rinks and skipping stones to places rich in history.

Dennis Cooley

Dennis Cooley has lived most of his life on the Canadian prairies, where for over 40 years he has been active as teacher, editor, poet, critic, anthologist, publisher, mentor, and supporter of writing. His work has been immersed in family, the prairies, and a play with form. His most recent titles include The Home Place (essays on Robert Kroetsch's poetry), and two books of poetry--Abecedarium and Departures.

Reviews

Dennis Cooley’s poetic meditation on “stones” is an expansive collage of locating the self in the diaspora of mythology, history, geography, and literature. Because this is a long poem of contemplation, Cooley’s locus mundi performs the outstanding range of skill and practice he is able to bring from a life of writing and attention. He is a master of poetry as technique and here shows us how such art can really “make the stone stony. ”
—Fred Wah, author of is a door

Look what a long poem can do, when it pursues the grubby and the grand with equal belief, nods to its mixed bag of forebears, and takes no syllable or line for granite, as the pun goes. Best of all, Cooley’s the stones plays hard.
—Gerald Hill, author of 14 Tractors

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