For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again

By Michel Tremblay
Translated by Linda Gaboriau

For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again
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For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again is Tremblay’s homage to his mother, who nurtured his imagination, his reclusive reading habits and his love for the theatre and the arts, yet who did not live to witness the performance of Les Belles Soeurs?the first successful play written ... Read more


Overview

For the Pleasure of Seeing Her Again is Tremblay’s homage to his mother, who nurtured his imagination, his reclusive reading habits and his love for the theatre and the arts, yet who did not live to witness the performance of Les Belles Soeurs?the first successful play written in joual with which Tremblay legitimized the Quebecois vernacular in the arts?and the world-wide acclaim for her son’s artistic genius. In a compelling balance of humour and poignancy, Tremblay offers glimpses of himself and his mother at five different stages of their lives together, culminating in his reassurance of his dying mother’s concern for him immediately prior to his spectacular success.

Linda Gaboriau

Linda Gaboriau is an award-winning literary translator based in Montreal. Her translations of plays by Quebec’s most prominent playwrights have been published and ­produced across Canada and abroad. In her work as a ­literary manager and dramaturge, she has directed ­numerous translation residencies and international exchange projects. She was the founding director of the Banff International Literary Translation Centre. Most recently she won the 2010 Governor General’s Award for Forests, her translation of the play by Wajdi Mouawad.

Reviews

“a lovely, funny, poignant look at Tremblay’s close relationship with his animated, storytelling mom – a mother who sadly didn’t live long enough to see Tremblay’s first big theatrical success. … Tremblay’s play has all the earmarks of the classic, universally recognized mother-son relationship. … While this story is specific to two people, the larger picture and subsequent reach of the piece is wide…”
The Province

“an ending worth sticking around for … a personal story. It’s the playwright’s tribute to his mother who never lived to see his first successful play. Yet the nearly 20-year-old script’s success is its universality, achieved by illustrating how a boy is shaped by his mother and her stories. … honest and sweet, managing to stir emotions without leaving us dewy-eyed. … This one doesn’t disappoint. ”
Richmond News

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