Bhopal

By Rahul Varma
Foreword by Guillermo Verdecchia

Bhopal
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Bhopal, 1984. With the presence of the Carbide International pesticide factory, the city begins to claw its way out of endemic poverty. But what is to be made of the deformed babies born to women living near the factory? And the poison gas explosion that will leave three thousand ... Read more


Overview

Bhopal, 1984. With the presence of the Carbide International pesticide factory, the city begins to claw its way out of endemic poverty. But what is to be made of the deformed babies born to women living near the factory? And the poison gas explosion that will leave three thousand people dead in just a few minutes—and will kill tens of thousands more in the years to come. How could have this happened?

Rahul Varma

Rahul Varma is a playwright, artistic director of Teesri Duniya Theatre, and co-founder of alt.theatre: cultural diversity and the stage. He writes both in Hindi and English, a language he acquired as an adult. Some of his other plays include Land Where the Trees Talk, No Man’s Land, Trading Injuries (a radio drama), and Truth and Treason. His plays have been translated into French, Italian, Hindi, and Punjabi. Rahul is the recipient of a special Juror’s Award from the Quebec Drama Federation, a Montreal English Critic’s Circle Award for promoting Interculturalism, and the South Asian Theatre Festival Award.

Guillermo Verdecchia

Guillermo Verdecchia
Guillermo Verdecchia is a writer of drama, fiction and film; a director, dramaturge, actor and translator whose work has been seen and heard on stages, screens and radios across the country and around the globe. He is a recipient of the Governor General’s Award for Drama, a four-time winner of the Chalmers Canadian Play Award, a recipient of Dora and Jessie Awards and sundry film festival awards for his film Crucero/Crossroads.

Reviews

"The characters who inhabit Rahul Varma's play [. ..] are all seeking the common good. But they are not guided by the same priorities or goals. To get what they want, they must negotiate with each other. Each time they do, something is lost. And these losses ultimately ad up to disaster. This play—a pitiless analysis of the stakes of globalization—explores how this happens. "

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