From Citizen to Refugee

By (author): Mahnood Mamdani

In his introduction to this third edition, Mahmood Mamdani reflects on the lessons since the expulsion of Asians from Uganda. How come, he asks, over 90% of residents of the country, brown or black, would not want to return to the days and years before the 1972 expulsion? The expulsion cannot just be understood as an event that occurred in 1972. He concludes, tere is no one Asian legacy. There are several, and they are contradictory. Not all are legacies we would like to wipe out from our collective memories. Some we would like to build on; others we would like to reform. Uganda Asians are a poor fit as victims. In a land known for sporadic massacres, there were no massacres of Asians. When massacres happened, they were of ‘indigenous’ people. Mamdani begins to explore the theme of political identity – the colonial politicisation of racial identity and its reproduction after independence – which has been the concern of much of his subsequent work, notably the groundbreaking Citizen and Subject. This gripping and highly readable story of the Asians’ last days in Uganda interweaves the stories of Mamdani’s friends and family with an examination of Uganda’s colonial history and the subsequent evolution of post-independence politics. The British colonial policy of divide and rule ensured that race coincided with class, effectively politicising the category of race. This vivid autobiographical account is as pertinent now as when the book was first published in 1973 in its telling of a story that will be familiar to refugees and those seeking asylum in Britain today.

AUTHOR

Mahnood Mamdani

Mahmood Mamdani is the Herbert Lehman Professor of Government. He was also professor and executive director of Makerere Institute of Social Research (2010-2022) in Kampala, where he established an inter-disciplinary doctoral program in Social Studies. He received his PhD from Harvard University in 1974 and specializes in the study of colonialism, anti-colonialism and decolonisation. His works explore the intersection between politics and culture, a comparative study of colonialism since 1452, the history of civil war and genocide in Africa, the Cold War and the War on Terror, the history and theory of human rights, and the politics of knowledge production. Prior to joining the Columbia faculty, Mamdani was a professor at the University of Dar-es-Salaam in Tanzania (1973-1979), Makerere University in Uganda (1980-1993), and the University of Cape Town (1996-1999).


Awards

There are no awards found for this book.
Excerpts & Samples ×
In his introduction to this third edition, Mahmood Mamdani reflects on the lessons since the expulsion of Asians from Uganda. How come, he asks, over 90% of residents of the country, brown or black, would not want to return to the days and years before the 1972 expulsion? The expulsion cannot just be understood as an event that occurred in 1972. He concludes, tere is no one Asian legacy. There are several, and they are contradictory. Not all are legacies we would like to wipe out from our collective memories. Some we would like to build on; others we would like to reform. Uganda Asians are a poor fit as victims. In a land known for sporadic massacres, there were no massacres of Asians. When massacres happened, they were of ‘indigenous’ people. Mamdani begins to explore the theme of political identity – the colonial politicisation of racial identity and its reproduction after independence – which has been the concern of much of his subsequent work, notably the groundbreaking Citizen and Subject. This gripping and highly readable story of the Asians’ last days in Uganda interweaves the stories of Mamdani’s friends and family with an examination of Uganda’s colonial history and the subsequent evolution of post-independence politics. The British colonial policy of divide and rule ensured that race coincided with class, effectively politicising the category of race. This vivid autobiographical account is as pertinent now as when the book was first published in 1973 in its telling of a story that will be familiar to refugees and those seeking asylum in Britain today.

Reader Reviews

Details

Dimensions:

108 Pages
9in * 6in * 1in
1lb

Published:

January 12, 2022

Country of Publication:

CA

Publisher:

Daraja Press

ISBN:

9781990263514

Book Subjects:

POLITICAL SCIENCE / Human Rights

Featured In:

All Books

Language:

eng

Other Titles by Mahnood Mamdani

No other books found.

Related Blog Posts

There are no posts with this book.