Women and Power

By Pascale Navarro, Pascale Navarro
Translated by David Homel, David Homel
Introduction by Sue Montgomery, and Sue Montgomery

Women and Power
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It's already passé to ask if parity is important for today's Canada. What's needed now is to ask how we can make sure more women run for office and that they're well-represented in government. There are no easy answers to this, but it's clear that half-measures just won't do. ... Read more


Overview

It's already passé to ask if parity is important for today's Canada. What's needed now is to ask how we can make sure more women run for office and that they're well-represented in government. There are no easy answers to this, but it's clear that half-measures just won't do. Pascale Navarro argues that quotas are essential for women to achieve parity with men in politics. Over a hundred other nations worldwide have already established parity as a goal. What are we waiting for?

Pascale Navarro

Montreal journalist and columnist Pascale Navarro is a frequent contributor to major newspapers and magazines as well as to radio and television broadcasts. Winner of the Women of Merit prize for Communications in 2007, she is the author of several feminist essays on contemporary social and political issues. Women and Power is the first of her books to appear in English.

Pascale Navarro

Montreal journalist and columnist Pascale Navarro is a frequent contributor to major newspapers and magazines as well as to radio and television broadcasts. Winner of the Women of Merit prize for Communications in 2007, she is the author of several feminist essays on contemporary social and political issues. Women and Power is the first of her books to appear in English.

Reviews

"This 80-page essay makes the case for gender parity in government in a concise, candid, and informative way. The book is a compilation of facts, statistics, and explanations that answer the hows, whys, and what ifs. It concludes that gender parity isn't tokenism but a new and improved way of doing things that forces adaptation in the political process before, during, and after elections."And make no mistake about it: there can be no real democracy where the concerns and issues of all are not represented."In pursuing gender parity, Navarro reminds us, Canada is far behind the hundred or so countries that have already made it obligatory, balancing political systems from which women were long excluded."But women aren't excluded from the political process in Canada!" I can already hear you saying. Here's where we disagree because exclusion can take many forms. It's not enough to legally allow women to run for office. It requires a concentrated effort to dismantle the system that refuses to make it worthwhile for them to run. And make no mistake about it: there can be no real democracy where the concerns and issues of all are not represented.Navarro underlines the role of the state in bringing about gender parity and emphasizes it's a way to bring in a new era of gender partnership. In other words, this isn't about women taking over (as many men's rights activists allude to), but ushering in a true partnership that would mean real change and representative democracy for all."That's the true value of partnership," Navarro writes. "It implies a political will to inclusion and taking into account women's perspectives in all fields, not just in areas deemed to be 'women's issues' (health, education, family)." -- Toula Drimonis, Ricochet

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