There Are Victories

By Charles Yale Harrison
Introduction by Johanna Skibsrud

There Are Victories
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There Are Victories is a proto-feminist, anti-Bildungsroman novel that explores the intersections of misogyny, class, religion, and prejudice within upper class Anglo-Montreal and New York City society during WWI. Originally published in 1933, There Are Victories takes up the ... Read more


Overview

There Are Victories is a proto-feminist, anti-Bildungsroman novel that explores the intersections of misogyny, class, religion, and prejudice within upper class Anglo-Montreal and New York City society during WWI. Originally published in 1933, There Are Victories takes up the catastrophe of the home front and the ways in which the life—and happiness—of the novel’s protagonist, Ruth Courtney, is continually undermined by the bad behaviour of men. This new edition will feature an introduction by Johanna Skibsrud.

Charles Yale Harrison

Charles Yale Harrison (1898–1954) was born in Philadelphia and raised in a Jewish family in Montreal. Harrison moved from Montreal to New York in the 1920s, where he worked on the staff of the Communist Party of America (CPUSA)-led magazine New Masses. Drawing on his own service in the First World War, he published Generals Die in Bed (1930), a scathingly anti-war novel about the horrors of trench warfare. The novel was well-received and was followed by the novels A Child is Born (1931), There Are Victories (1933), Meet Me on the Barricades (1938), and Nobody’s Fool (1948).

Johanna Skibsrud

Johanna Skibsrud is the author of two previous collections of poetry, I Do Not Think that I Could Love a Human Being and Late Nights With Wild Cowboys; two novels, Quartet for the End of Time and the 2010 Scotiabank Giller Prize-winning novel The Sentimentalists; and the short fiction collection This Will Be Difficult to Explain and Other Stories. An Assistant Professor of English at the University of Arizona, Skibsrud and her family divide their time between Tucson and Cape Breton.

Reviews

“Written in an exquisitely modulated manner that is admirably suited to its matter, Mr.
Harrison’s novel is a delicate, penetrating study of a woman’s soul, crowded with dramatic
incident and stripped of all the futile irrelevancies that make the usual novel such a trial to
read. ”—from the original dustjacket copy

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