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Shortlisted, Toronto Book Awards

On May 2, 1967, Montreal and Toronto faced each other in a battle for hockey supremacy. This was only the fifth time the teams had ever played each other in the Stanley Cup finals. Toronto led the series 3-2.

But this wasn't simply a game. From ... Read more


Overview

Shortlisted, Toronto Book Awards

On May 2, 1967, Montreal and Toronto faced each other in a battle for hockey supremacy. This was only the fifth time the teams had ever played each other in the Stanley Cup finals. Toronto led the series 3-2.

But this wasn't simply a game. From the moment Foster Hewitt announced "Hello Canada and hockey fans in the United States," the game became a turning point in sports history. That night, the Leafs would win the Cup. The next season, the National Hockey League would expand to twelve teams. Players would form an association to begin collective bargaining. Hockey would become big business. The NHL of the "Original Six" would be a thing of the past.

It was The Last Hockey Game.

Placing us in the announcers' booth, in the seats of excited fans, and in the skates of the players, Bruce McDougall scores with a spectacular account of every facet of that final fateful match. As we meet players such as Gump Worsley, Tim Horton, Terry Sawchuk, and Eddie Shack, as well as coaches, owners, and fans, The Last Hockey Game becomes more than a story of a game. It also becomes an elegy, a lament for an age when, for all its many problems, the game was played for the love of it.

Awards

  • Toronto Book Awards 2015, Short-listed

Reader Reviews

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Becky Livingston

Lost Lagoon/lost in thought is a stunning book. Warland’s loyalty to both language, and the lagoon, is tenderly wrought, and instructive.

The reader is privy to the author’s deeply perceptive observations, and is reminded of life’s fragility, both in nature and in humans. The inverse relationship between Warland’s own griefs and joys, and lagoon life, is particularly powerful.

“Once again, it is time to let go. Be unmoored. /Adapt to lightness.”

Lost Lagoon/lost in thought provides a crucial perspective of one of Vancouver’s most endearing, and threatened locations. What a treasure!

Becky Livingston

Mrs

This is an excellent, powerful collection. It begins with the arrival of the Campbell clan in Canada in 1827 and moves forward in time through history, negotiating the half lives of the past upon the present. The poems here have a notable clarity and striking originality. I'm looking forward to reading more by Campbell.

Nell