Searching for Petronius Totem

By Peter Unwin

Searching for Petronius Totem
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Following a dramatic break-up with his long-suffering wife, Jack Vesoovian retreats to a Hamilton rooming house, where he impulsively decides to take to the road to track down his life-long colleague, Petronius Totem.

Petronius Totem has disappeared following the unlikely success ... Read more


Overview

Following a dramatic break-up with his long-suffering wife, Jack Vesoovian retreats to a Hamilton rooming house, where he impulsively decides to take to the road to track down his life-long colleague, Petronius Totem.

Petronius Totem has disappeared following the unlikely success of his memoir, Ten Thousand Busted Chunks, praised for its searing honesty. But when it is discovered to be a pack of lies, Petronius Totem becomes universally despised.

Meanwhile, Jack faces another grim truth: the world is being taken over by a sinister multi-national Fibre-Optic Catering business that has created a chicken-like food matter than can actually fly. Can he and Petronius Totem escape into a virtual future that is free of Chick Lit and flying fibre-optic chickens? Or will Jack return home to his wife Elaine whom it seems, with good reason, will shoot him on sight?

Searching for Petronius Totem is a love story for the age: a wild, imaginative, and utterly original novel.

Peter Unwin

Peter Unwin is the author of eight previous books, including his latest novel Searching for Petronius Totem, as well as many short stories, essays and poems. His short story collection Life Without Death was shortlisted for the 2014 Trillium Book Award, and his poetry collection When We Were Old, was a Relit Award finalist. He is currently completing a PhD in the Humanities at York University.

Reviews

“[A] coruscating, frustrating, and sometimes blisteringly funny evisceration of sacred cows in the realms of digital technology, identity politics, and CanLit… a scabrous, gleefully offensive, high-energy ride across a landscape that looks oddly familiar, but is viewed at an oblique angle and through a purposefully distorted lens. ” —Quill and Quire

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