Sasquatch and the Green Sash

By Keith Henderson
Introduction by Kevin Whetter
Illustrated by Steve Adams

Sasquatch and the Green Sash
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Sasquatch and the Green Sash is at once a translation and adaptation of the medieval English poem Sir Gwain and the Green Knight, from a time when parts of English culture were closer to Old Norse roots.
Novelist Henderson has chosen to Canadianize the original, setting it ... Read more


Overview

Sasquatch and the Green Sash is at once a translation and adaptation of the medieval English poem Sir Gwain and the Green Knight, from a time when parts of English culture were closer to Old Norse roots.
Novelist Henderson has chosen to Canadianize the original, setting it among the Dene of Nahanni National Park in the NWT. This new setting is darker, colder, and sub?arctic with the 'ominous green and violet and pink of Aurora Borealis," and the additional dimension of the ancint Green Man's origins as Al Khidr, vizier of Alexander the Great.

Keith Henderson

Keith Henderson has published three previous novels, (The Restoration, DC Books, 1994, The Beekeeper, DC Books, 1990, The Roof Walkers, DC Books 2013), a collection of political essays from when he was Quebec columnist for the Financial Post (Staying Canadian, DC Books, 1997), and a prize—winning book of short stories (The Pagan Nuptials of Julia, DC Books, 2006). He led a small provincial political party in Quebec during the separatist referendum of 1995 and championed English language rights and the "poison pill" strategy of partitioning Quebec if ever Quebec partitioned Canada, positions covered in full length articles in the Los Angeles and New York Times as well as on CBS 60 Minutes.

Excerpt

Magic ovals and circles decorate the northern land, interlink one with another; in secret hollows, nests, and caves, in birds? eggs and in the bellies of foxes, field mice, and bears, small heads grow and acquire their features, fleeting as a gust of wind.

Reviews

?Henderson retells a powerful tale with dignity and grace, successfully transplanting a poem rooted in the mediaeval Arthurian past into a particularly Canadian mythos. ?? K. S. WHETTER, Acadia University INTRODUCTION, SASQUATCH AND THE GREEN SASH

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