Readopolis

By Bertrand Laverdure
Translated by Oana Avasilichioaei

Readopolis
  • Currently 0 out of 5 Stars.
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5

Sign-up or sign-in to rate this book.


From award-winning writer Bertrand Laverdure comes Readopolis, a novel translated by Oana Avasilichioaei.

It's 2006 and down-and-out protagonist Ghislain works as a reader for a publishing house in Montreal. He's bored with all the wannabe writers who are determined to leave ... Read more


Overview

From award-winning writer Bertrand Laverdure comes Readopolis, a novel translated by Oana Avasilichioaei.

It's 2006 and down-and-out protagonist Ghislain works as a reader for a publishing house in Montreal. He's bored with all the wannabe writers who are determined to leave a trace of their passage on earth with their feeble attempts at literary arts. Obsessed by literature and its future (or lack thereof), he reads everything he can in order to translate reality into the literary delirium that is Readopolis--a world imagined out of Chicago and Montreal, with few inhabitants, a convenience store, a parrot, and all kinds of dialogues running amok: cinematic, epistolary, theatrical, and Socratic.

In the pages of Readopolis, Laverdure playfully examines the idea that human beings are more connected by their reading abilities than by anything else. Funny and sardonic, whimsical and tragic, this postmodern novel with touches of David Foster Wallace and Raymond Queneau portrays the global village of readers that the Internet created, even before the 2.0 revolution.

Praise for Lectodôme

"Brilliant, playful, perfectly convincing, Lectodôme has everything to place Laverdure in the ranks of the 'sickest literary greats.'" --Le Devoir

"An intensely unapologetic hybrid work--zigzagging between a story within a story, epistolary novel, screenplay, and more--Lectodôme is delightfully intelligent and fantastical." --Voir

Bertrand Laverdure

Bertrand Laverdure is an award-winning poet, novelist, literary performer, and blogger. His poetry publications include Rires (2004) and Sept et demi (2007). He has written four well-received novels, Gomme de xanthane (2006), Lectodôme (2008), J'invente la piscine (2010), Bureau universel des copyrights (2011). Lettres crues, a book of literary correspondence with Quebecois author Pierre Samson, was published in the fall of 2012. Most recently, he published a YA poetry collection, Cascadeuse (2013). Awards include the Joseph S. Stauffer Prize from the Canada Council for the Arts (1999), and the Rina-Lasnier Award for Poetry for Les forêts (2003). Les forêts was also nominated for the Emile-Nelligan Award for Poetry (2000), while Audioguide was nominated for the Grand Prix du Festival International de Poésie de Trois-Rivières (2003), and Lectodôme for the Grand Prix littéraire Archambault (2009). Find Laverdure on his blog, http://technicien-coffeur.blogspot.ca/, follow him on Twitter @lectodome, or connect with him on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/bertrand.laverdure.

Oana Avasilichioaei's previous translations include Wigrum by Quebecois writer Daniel Canty (2013), The Islands by Quebecoise poet Louise Cotnoir (2011) and Occupational Sickness by Romanian poet Nichita St?nescu (2006). In 2013, she edited a feature on Quebec French writing in translation for Aufgabe (New York). she has also played in the bounds of translation and creation in a poetic collaboration with Erín Moure, Expeditions of a Chimæra, (2009). Her most recent poetry collection is We, Beasts (2012; winner of the QWF's A.M. Klein Prize for Poetry), and her audio work can be found on Pennsound. She lives in Montreal. Learn more about Avasilichioaei at www.oanalab.com.

Oana Avasilichioaei

Exploring the infinite social, political, intimate possibilities of language, Oana Avasilichioaei’s work traverses textual architecture, orality and multilingualism, translation and collaboration, and geography and public space. In recent years, Avasilichioaei has also been mapping poetry into performative sound work (oanalab.com).

Born in Romania and living in Montreal, Canada, she has translated poetry and prose from Romanian (Nichita Stanescu’s Occupational Sickness and the work of Paul Celan) and from French (Louise Cotnoir’s The Islands, Daniel Canty’s Wigrum, and Bertrand Laverdure’s Universal Bureau of Copyrights).

Avasilichioaei has edited several magazine issues, including the Poetry in Translation from Quebec issue of Aufgabe (New York, 2013) and the Mapping issue of Dandelion (Calgary, 2011). Current projects include Thresholds, which transposes some of the work in Limbinal into sound performances and immersive installations, as well as a collaborative translation with Ingrid Pam Dick of Suzanne Leblanc’s The House as P’s Thinking upcoming 2015.

Reader Reviews

Tell us what you think!

Sign Up or Sign In to add your review or comment.