Easily Fooled

By H. Nigel Thomas

Easily Fooled
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Less than an hour after Millington receives his permanent resident visa, he wonders if his husband Jay would now end their marriage. And Jay has multiple reasons to. Millington is an ex-Methodist minister, who once believed he could be celibate. When he fled Caribbean Methodism ... Read more


Overview

Less than an hour after Millington receives his permanent resident visa, he wonders if his husband Jay would now end their marriage. And Jay has multiple reasons to. Millington is an ex-Methodist minister, who once believed he could be celibate. When he fled Caribbean Methodism and came to Montreal, he thought he’d resolved the issues that made him leave, but he comes to understand that psychological trauma, childhood conditioning, parental and community expectations and his own need for community and family valorization are not easily exorcised. The third installment in the No Safeguards quartet of novels.

H. Nigel Thomas

Recipient of the Martin Luther King Jr. Achievement Award (2020) and The Molson Prize for the arts (2022)

Born in St. Vincent and the Grenadines and living in Quebec since 1968, H. Nigel Thomas is the author of four novels (including No Safeguards with Guernica), three collections of short fiction, a collection of poems and two scholarly texts.

Reviews

It is a fairly boisterous atmosphere we are drawn into at the outset – and it comes in welcome sharp contrast to that trend of moody psycho-sexual novels about two or three lonesome people in downtown high-rises or sitting on rock cliffs in lonely coastal fishing towns. I mean, it’s okay to ponder over just-released criminal pedophile uncles in isolated towns, but there is a world outside worth talking about as well, and that is what makes Thomas’ novel invigorating, intelligent and persistent about the original sin of religious doctrinairism.

Montreal Serai

Complex questions regarding the queerness of one’s status emerge in Easily Fooled. These questions take us beyond a focus on sexuality as the dominant or singular attribute of queerness in the archipelago. The novel attends to how one’s immigrant status dictates how Caribbean peoples might be queered in diaspora.

Small Axe

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