Dreyd

By Daniel Heath Justice
Edited by Kateri Akiwenzie-Damm

Dreyd
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The forces of Eromar ravage the Everland, and the skies are filled with the smoke and ashes of the burning woods. Those Folk who do not escape into the far mountains and hidden valleys are driven into the broken westlands of Humanity, where Dreydmaster Vald reveals the full ... Read more


Overview

The forces of Eromar ravage the Everland, and the skies are filled with the smoke and ashes of the burning woods. Those Folk who do not escape into the far mountains and hidden valleys are driven into the broken westlands of Humanity, where Dreydmaster Vald reveals the full vision of his mad crusade, one that will annihilate even the memory of the Kyn and their kind.One group of heroes walks the Darkening Road to rescue the exiles, and another travels to the capital city of Men to make a last, desperate appeal, but both know that these days will determine the fate of the Folk in this Melded world. Will their roots hold fast, or will they be cast adrift into the storm? Can they find a safe middle path on this way of thorn and thunder?

Daniel Heath Justice

Daniel Heath Justice (Cherokee Nation) is Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Literature and Expressive Culture and Chair of the First Nations Studies Program at the University of British Columbia, unceded Musqueam territory. His previous publications include a study of Cherokee literature, Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History, and the Way of Thorn and Thunder series from Kegedonce Press (omnibus edition from the University of New Mexico Press). His most recent publications are Badger, part of the Animal Series from Reaktion Books (UK), and the co-edited Oxford Handbook of Indigenous American Literature. Current works include the literary manifesto, Why Indigenous Literature Matters (forthcoming from Wilfrid Laurier University Press), a study of other-than-human kinship in Indigenous literary expression, and a new dark fantasy trilogy.

Reviews

Come on a journey of ancient worlds, mysterious creatures, warriors and primeval tales told through remarkable images and fantasy-driven dialogue. Think of it as Lord of the Rings set in the culture and wisdom of Aboriginal society in North America...Published by Kegedonce Press, this fantasy epic could have been written by J.R.R. Tolkien - if he was Indian. - SPIRIT MAGAZINE, Autumn 2005

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