Canada Keeps Reading Day 4

March 19, 2015

Today was a day of highs and lows on Canada Reads, with only one book left standing at the end of the day. As big supporters of independent Canadian publishers, their authors, and books, we were firmly on #TeamMovies but we'd like to congratulate Ru, Kim Thúy, and Cameron Bailey on a job well done. We'll shine the spotlight on Ru and its themes tomorrow but for now we want to focus on the runner-up.

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Today was a day of highs and lows on Canada Reads, with only one book left standing at the end of the day. As big supporters of independent Canadian publishers, their authors, and books, we were firmly on #TeamMovies but we'd like to congratulate Ru, Kim Thúy, and Cameron Bailey on a job well done. We'll shine the spotlight on Ru and its themes tomorrow but for now we want to focus on the runner-up.

Elaine Lui did a fantastic job of defending Raziel Reid's When Everything Feels Like the Movies (published by friend of ALU, Arsenal Pulp Press) and gave listeners a lot to think about. Her bold and frank defence of the book was similar to the attitude of the main character, Jude. He insists on being true to himself, even if that gets him beat up regularly at school and harassed by his step father at home. While Jude's story is just that -- a story -- it is also one that has played out in reality many times, with different details, but similar results. If you feel the issues raised in When Everything Feels Like the Movies are barriers you want to continue talking about, here are just a few titles to get you on your way.

 

CanadaReads_WhenEverythingFeels

 

Age of Minority
by Jordan Tannahill (Playwrights Canada Press)

This collection of three short dramas all feature queer youth who are dealing with violence and intolerance: a young lesbian defects from the army when she is outed by fellow soldiers; in 1962 we spend the last 52 minutes in the life of Peter, a young teen shot to death trying to cross the Berlin Wall with his companion; and a teen’s life takes a turn after YouTube videos of him dancing to his favourite pop princess go viral.

Prairie Ostrich
by Tamai Kobayashi (Goose Lane Editions)

Kathy is tormented at school because the other kids sense that she is “different”; her best friend and lover Stacey turns her back on Kathy when it becomes apparent that Kathy’s allegiance lies with her family, especially her younger sister, Egg, whom she must care for.

St. Francis of Millbrook
by Sky Gilbert (Playwrights Canada Press)

Growing up in rural Ontario in the 1990s with a homophobic father is not easy for a teenage boy with a tenacious love for Madonna in this new play from Sky Gilbert.

Queer Monologues: Stories of LGBT Youth
produced by For the Love of Learning (Breakwater Books)
 
The monologues featured in this collection give queer youth a safe, creative outlet to be themselves and share their concerns, hopes, and personal stories.

Hot, Wet, and Shaking
by Kayleigh Trace (Invisible Publishing)

Disabled, queer, sex educator Trace chronicles her sexual journey from ignorance to bliss in this frank book for adults. Sparing no details, Trace discusses expectations, bodily negotiations, attempts at adulthood, and some of the bullshit surrounding sex.

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Missed the first part of Canada Keeps Reading week? You can catch up on our previous recommendations on Day 1, Day 2, and Day 3.


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