Trusting the Tale

By Hugh Hood

Trusting the Tale
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This collection of essays shows Hood in full, elegant control of a variety of subjects that will appeal to those interested in Canadian literary history and to anyone involved with the literary currents of our time. The essays are detailed, complex, and enriched by the sensibility ... Read more


Overview

This collection of essays shows Hood in full, elegant control of a variety of subjects that will appeal to those interested in Canadian literary history and to anyone involved with the literary currents of our time. The essays are detailed, complex, and enriched by the sensibility of the author who has been called “Canada`s most learned, most intellectual novelist” (The Canadian Forum). At the same time, they display Hood`s unique ability to convey intellectual ideas with warmth, humor, and passionate conviction. He is that rare breed of author whose books are inspired by a profound commitment to art, a deep love of his community, a sensitive involvement with language, and an ongoing engagement with theoretical problems crucial to twentieth-century thought.

Hugh Hood

Hugh Hood was a Canadian novelist, short story writer, essayist, and university professor. He wrote thirty-two books, including seventeen novels and several volumes of short fiction. In 1988, he was made an Officer of the Order of Canada.

Reviews

“Hood's assured artistry, deep Christian conviction, and refusal of obliquity in these essays constitute a significant introduction to his fiction in their tones, textures, depths, and entertaining instructiveness.”  —Choice

Trusting the Tale consists of 11 essays on topics ranging from personal reminiscence to hockey, other artists, and the craft of writing.”  —Quill & Quire

Trusting the Tale is Hugh Hood at his most accessible and most entertaining. These essays may help convince CanLit followes that Mr. Hood is one of the few Canadian novelists who can call themselves men of letters.”  —Winnipeg Free Press

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