TheAbsolute Is a Round Die

By José Acquelin
Translated by Hugh Hazelton

TheAbsolute Is a Round Die
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The Absolute Is a Round Die is a work of metaphysical meditation, a verbal mural painting, a restless search for a way to speak the unspeakable, know the unknowable, attain the unattainable. It travels through Middle Eastern sensuality and mysticism, seeking the transcendence ... Read more


Overview

The Absolute Is a Round Die is a work of metaphysical meditation, a verbal mural painting, a restless search for a way to speak the unspeakable, know the unknowable, attain the unattainable. It travels through Middle Eastern sensuality and mysticism, seeking the transcendence within what is at hand, discovering the invisible.

José Acquelin

José Acquelin was born in Montreal to Occitan parents. Since 1987, he has published over twenty poetry collections, including "Anarchie de la lumière" which won the 2014 Governor General's Literary Award for poetry in the French language. He is also a producer and host of many poetry and music events. He currently lives in Montreal. Howard Scott was born in southwestern Ontario and moved to Quebec in 1975. His translation of "L'Euguélionne" by Louky Bersianik won the Governor General's Literary Award in 1997. He has translated many poetry, fiction, and non-fiction titles, often in collaboration with Phyllis Aronoff. In 2001, they won the Quebec Writers' Federation Translation Award and in 2009 they were shortlisted for the Governor General's Literary Award. He is a past president of the Literary Translators' Association of Canada. He currently lives in Montreal.

Reviews

The Absolute is a Round Die is a work of passionate wisdom, with poetry that opens endless possibilities for creating the improbable. [..] It is a book that cannot be read at one sitting : its meaning alternately escapes one?s grasp and then returns, with an overwhelming force that calls out to our intelligence. [...] Happiness and poetry are indeed sometimes intertwined. ? Hugues Corriveau, Lettres québécoises, fall 2007 In his quest for images as transparent as water in the desert, Acquelin?s work is rooted in a poetic tradition inspired by the Middle East, with a strange clarity that at times brings to mind the poetry of Alain Grandbois and Omar Khayyám. [...] Acquelin is never at a loss for marvels, proclaiming that ?Joy lies in burning.?? Maxime Catellier, Ici, May 3-9, 2007

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