The.Hope.

By Craig Francis Power
Edited by Beth Follett

The.Hope.
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Jack Kerouac's On The Road meets Iggy Pop. // Newfoundland is the site of one of the few successful campaigns of genocide in human history. That everything written in Newfoundland and Labrador doesn't address this Craig Francis Power finds shocking and telling. But Power didn't ... Read more


Overview

Jack Kerouac's On The Road meets Iggy Pop. // Newfoundland is the site of one of the few successful campaigns of genocide in human history. That everything written in Newfoundland and Labrador doesn't address this Craig Francis Power finds shocking and telling. But Power didn't want to write a romantic fictionalized version of history--he wanted to write something that showed how historical trauma runs alongside contemporary trauma: both personal and otherwise. The.Hope. investigates many current Newfoundland and Labrador struggles: the tensions between official and unofficial memory and culture, the desire for radical and just economic and social change in the face of a dumbed down culture, apathy, selfishness, greed, celebrity worship et al. The.Hope. will speak in particular to critically minded people who find anything that calls itself an industry, such as the "cultural industry," suspect. Power's novel is sad, it's funny and it's clever, it's self-aware and self-critical.

Craig Francis Power

Craig Francis Power is a writer and visual artist from St. John's, Newfoundland. His first novel, Blood Relatives, won the 2011 ReLit Award and was short-listed for the BMO Winterset Award. His visual art has shown at galleries across Canada.

Beth Follett

Beth Follett lives in St. John's NL and is the publisher of Pedlar Press. Her first novel, Tell It Slant, was published in 2001 by Coach House.

Reviews

What Herb Wyile, foremost scholar of Atlantic Canadian literature, has said of New Brunswick novelist David Adams Richards can also be said of [Craig Francis] Power in this instance: he persists "in his artistic vision while happily tipping the sacred cows of what he sees as a self-righteously progressive, middle-class academic and literary establishment." The. Hope. is as much a contribution to the canon of Newfoundland and Labrador literature as it is a metafictive lampooning of itself, its contemporaries, and the whole scholarly and financial system by which it draws breath. It is in this way a delightfully and distressingly uncanny read. The familiar is made decidedly unfamiliar, and unsure of where to stand in the face of such a work, the reader can only run after it, beguiled, bemused, confused, delighted. --Paul Chafe, NL Studies

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