The Red Album

By Chris Eaton

The Red Album
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In the tradition of Borges, Nabakov, and Bolaño, The Red Album is a work of fiction that questions historical authenticity and authority. Divided into two parts, the book begins with an edited and footnoted narrative of dubious origins. In the second part, a section of "documents" ... Read more


Overview

In the tradition of Borges, Nabakov, and Bolaño, The Red Album is a work of fiction that questions historical authenticity and authority. Divided into two parts, the book begins with an edited and footnoted narrative of dubious origins. In the second part, a section of "documents" (including essays, memoirs, a short play and a filmography) shed light on the first narrative. Familiar characters are revealed to be writers, and the writer and editors of the initial narrative are revealed to be characters. As the ghosts of social revolutions of the past are lifted from the soil in Catalonia, and a new revolution unfolds in South America, the number of mysteriously missing author/characters grows almost as fast as new author/ characters emerge and complicate and scatter the threads of the story.

Chris Eaton

Chris Eaton is a musician and novelist from New Brunswick, currently living in Toronto. He is the author of two novels, The Inactivist (2003) and The Grammar Architect (2005). His most recent album with ensemble Rock Plaza Central was given four stars by Rolling Stone and was selected by Pitchfork, CMJ, and Magnet, as one of the 10 best of 2006.

Reviews

In The Red Album, the scene of Spain and the fragile legacy of a poet occasion a series of astonishing entries into the archives and affects of revolution. Stephen Collis turns sharply away from “the department of historical memory,” exploring, instead, those alternative theatres of language and social struggle within which the past may be recovered and critically animated. This is a moving and also a challenging book, precisely because it confronts this enduring imperative: “We must see again what ways we can be together.”
– David Chariandy

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