The Bones are There

By Kate Sutherland

The Bones are There
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Zigzagging across the globe, Kate Sutherland's fourth book is poetry by way of collage: pieced-together excerpts from travellers' journals, ships' logs, textbooks and manuals, individual testimony, even fairy and folk tales that tell stories of extinction—of various species, ... Read more


Overview

Zigzagging across the globe, Kate Sutherland's fourth book is poetry by way of collage: pieced-together excerpts from travellers' journals, ships' logs, textbooks and manuals, individual testimony, even fairy and folk tales that tell stories of extinction—of various species, and of our own understanding of, and culpability within, its process. Across its three sections, Sutherland draws identifiable connections between various animal extinctions and human legacies of imperialism, colonialism, capitalism, and misogyny, charting the ways in which they juxtapose one another while impacting the natural order of things.

As much as it is a critique of humanity's disastrous effects on this world, The Bones Are There is also a celebration of such incredible creatures, all sadly lost to us. It honours their memory by demanding accountability and encouraging resistance, so that we might stave off future irrevocable loss and preserve what wonders that remain.

Praise for How To Draw a Rhinoceros:

"Sutherland takes bits and pieces of the journals, diaries, etc. of various travellers, naturalists, menagerists, and zoo keepers of the time to create something akin to found poems with a distinctly modern political bent. " —Saskatoon StarPhoenix

Kate Sutherland

Kate Sutherland was born in Scotland, immigrated to Canada as a child, and grew up in Saskatoon. She studied first at the University of Saskatchewan, then at Harvard Law School. She is the author of two collections of short stories, Summer Reading (winner, Saskatchewan Book Award for Best First Book) and All in Together Girls, and the poetry collection, How to Draw a Rhinoceros (shortlisted for a Creative Writing Book Award by the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment). Her stories and poems have appeared in various magazines and anthologies including Best Canadian Poetry and Best American Experimental Writing. She has done residencies at Hawthornden Castle in Scotland and at the Leighton Artist Studios in Banff. She lives in Toronto where she is a professor and conducts research in the fields of Tort Law, Feminist Legal Theory, and Law and Literature at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University.

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