Strangers & Others

By Stan Dragland
Edited by Don McKay

Strangers & Others
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Goon Show meets Jonathan Swift: that's The Great Eastern. Guy Davenport meets the CBC: that's Dragland. // Much has changed in the profile of Newfoundland culture in the time since The Great Eastern went off the air on CBC Radio. There has been a new and wider wave of Newfoundland ... Read more


Overview

Goon Show meets Jonathan Swift: that's The Great Eastern. Guy Davenport meets the CBC: that's Dragland. // Much has changed in the profile of Newfoundland culture in the time since The Great Eastern went off the air on CBC Radio. There has been a new and wider wave of Newfoundland cultural renaissance, making it more and more difficult for Canadians to sustain "Newfie" stereotypes. But in 1996 it was still possible for the likes of Stan Dragland to know little more than the stereotypical about Newfoundland. The stereotype exerts a strong invisible influence until something shatters it. For Dragland, that was The Great Eastern show. Written partly in the spirit of the show, Dragland's essay is not only thoughtful but funny. It's meant to be an entertaining book, fun to read if not light and frothy, unorthodox in form and content. In that it's like several of Dragland's other books and, come to think of it, if one can locate readers interested in unconventional non-fiction that finds its own form: jackpot!

Stan Dragland

Stan Dragland was born and brought up in Alberta. He was educated at The University of Alberta and Queen's University. He has taught at the University of Alberta, at The Grammar School, Sudbury, Suffolk, England, in the English Department at the University of Western Ontario in London, and in the Banff Centre Writing Studio. He now lives in St. John's, Newfoundland. He was founding editor of Brick, a journal of reviews and founder of Brick Books, a poetry publishing house, which he still serves as publisher and editor. Between 1993 and 1996 he was poetry editor for McClelland and Stewart. He has published three previous books of fiction: Peckertracks, a Chronicle (shortlisted for the 1978 Books in Canada First Novel Prize), Journeys Through Bookland and Other Passages, and (for children) Simon Jesse's Journey. He has edited collections of essays on Duncan Campbell Scott and James Reaney. Wilson MacDonald's Western Tour, a 'critical collage,' has been followed by two other books of criticism, The Bees of the Invisible: Essays in Contemporary English Canadian Writing and Floating Voice: Duncan Campbell Scott and the Literature of Treaty 9, which won the 1995 Gabrielle Roy Prize for Canadian Literary Criticism. 12 Bars, a prose blues, was co-winner of the bp Nichol Chapbook Award in 2003, the same year Apocrypha: Further Journeys appeared in NeWest Press's Writer-as-Critic series. Apocrypha was winner of the Rogers Cable Non-Fiction Award in 2005. In April 2004 the stage adaptation of HalldÛr Laxness's The Atom Station, co-written with Agnes Walsh, was performed at the LSPU Hall in St. John's. His most recent book is Stormy Weather: Foursomes, prose poetry from Pedlar Press, was shortlisted for the EJ Pratt Poetry Award in 2007. He is editor of the recently-released Hard-Headed and Big-Hearted: Writing Newfoundland, a collection of essays by Newfoundland historian Stuart Pierson.

Don McKay

Don McKay is a poet, teacher and editor. He has published about a dozen books in a career that spans four decades. He has twice won the Governor General’s Literary Awards for poetry, and his book Strike/Slip won the 2007 Griffin Poetry Prize. His previous essay collections include the GG-shortlisted Vis à Vis: Field Notes on Poetry & Wilderness and Deactivated West 100. McKay lives in St. John’s, Newfoundland.

 

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