Moving to Climate Change Hours

By Ross Belot

Moving to Climate Change Hours
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Ross Belot's latest collection is a dark ode to the end of oil. From industrial accidents to frozen highways Belot charts the ends of a life that face a working man in stripped-down lyric poetry. These are poems that have seen it all and acknowledge the darkness that's coming ... Read more


Overview

Ross Belot's latest collection is a dark ode to the end of oil. From industrial accidents to frozen highways Belot charts the ends of a life that face a working man in stripped-down lyric poetry. These are poems that have seen it all and acknowledge the darkness that's coming while still finding beauty in the arched neck of a tundra swan. Belot has a filmmaker's sense of atmosphere and an environmentalist's urgency and his stark lines take the reader deep into the heart of industrial man.

Ross Belot

Ross Belot is a poet, photographer, documentary filmmaker, and an energy and climate change columnist. He previously worked for a major Canadian petroleum company for decades before retiring in 2014. Now he writes ecopoetics and opinion pieces about government climate change inaction. Ross was a finalist for the CBC Poetry Prize in 2016 and longlisted in 2018. In 2017, he completed an MFA at Saint Mary's College of California. Born in Ottawa, Ross has made his home in the Golden Horseshoe since 1970.

Reviews

"Ross Belot's astonishing poetry steps off a moving train into the unknown. He deftly locates strangeness in the ordinary – in a sagging couch that shifts from one place to another in a room, or in a magpie that walks 'through her body. ' We find 'Yesterday was all chainsaw' in poems that buzz with power, defying expectation. Moving to Climate Change Hours is a remarkable book, revealing a poet at the height of his craft. " – Anne Simpson, author of Strange Attractor

"It is wonderful to read these confident, wide-ranging poems. Belot takes recognizable subjects – work, marriage, parenting, drinking with co-workers, childhood, new love – and makes them strange again. Shifting between Canadian and American landscapes and locales, and using many different poetic forms, what emerges is a strong yet questioning personality, confronting his own life in middle age, as well as his own complicity in larger catastrophes. It's a beautiful, intimate, ambitious, moving book written by a poet of great skill and deep feeling. " – Matthew Zapruder, author of Father's Day

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