Lost Time Accidents

By Síle Englert

Lost Time Accidents
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In this timely and powerful debut, Síle Englert explores what it is to feel othered in a world where everything is connected. Moving through time and memory — from childhood to motherhood, from historical figures and events to the precarious environment of the Anthropocene ... Read more


Overview

In this timely and powerful debut, Síle Englert explores what it is to feel othered in a world where everything is connected. Moving through time and memory — from childhood to motherhood, from historical figures and events to the precarious environment of the Anthropocene — Englert’s voice brims with grief while still holding space for whimsy.

Juxtaposing unlikely metaphors and inchoate memories, these poems wander a timeline where Amelia Earhart’s bones call out from the past, an abandoned department store mannequin keeps an eye on the future, and spacecraft sing to each other through the dark: "we are only what we remember. " Unearthing objects beautiful and bizarre, The Lost Time Accidents challenges the reader’s perceptions, finding empathy for the lost, the broken, and the overlooked.

Síle Englert

Síle Englert is a queer, Autistic writer and multidisciplinary artist from London, Ontario. She is the author of two chapbooks: The Phobic’s Handbook and Threadbare. Her poetry and fiction work have appeared in the Fiddlehead, Canthius, Room Magazine, and the Dalhousie Review.

Excerpt

"Garbage Disposal"

My mouth, where you put discarded things:
rust icicle broken from a car-body,
dark apron, its pocket still heavy with coins,
finger-painting in purple, black and blue.

I swallowed paper names
your tongue stumbled, forgot
and spat, mispronounced, at the air.

Wore down my teeth chewing cast-off
clothing, hoping saliva would dissolve
your smell, a dusting of cells.

My mouth, your unwilling oubliette:
tonguing broken aquarium glass,
the taste of ink licked from salt palms,
my lips mottled by storm clouds.

I eat your leftovers.

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