creole métisse of french canada, me

By Sharron Proulx-Turner

creole métisse of french canada, me
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Sharron's poems and writings in creole métisse of french canada, me include insights into her experiences as a child, a student and beyond; inviting the reader to understand her life, Métis experience in Canada, the true stories from the inside out. "if I could believe that, ... Read more


Overview

Sharron's poems and writings in creole métisse of french canada, me include insights into her experiences as a child, a student and beyond; inviting the reader to understand her life, Métis experience in Canada, the true stories from the inside out. "if I could believe that, then maybe I could believe my own childhood pictures and words all neatly drawn and gridded and hidden inside dust devils on clean white paper, like cartoons in a comic book. I learned a cartoon can be a stand-alone drawing on strong, large paper. so I changed up the form. a cartoon. life size. bright crayon scribbles painted over with black india ink. but willow stick scratches on the surface revealed a new story underneath. clear, living sundog colour blink-blinking out and into the room. I wrote a new story that way. already I believed in the power of writing. already I knew how words could pull you in, their power unyielding. binding." - Excerpt from creole metisse of french canada, me

Sharron Proulx-Turner

Sharron Proulx-Turner is a member of the Métis Nation of Alberta. Originally from the Ottawa river valley, Sharron is from Algonquin, Ojibwe, Mohawk, Wyandat, Mi'kmaw, French and Irish ancestry. She's a two-spirit nokomis, mom, writer and community worker. Where the Rivers Join (1995), a memoir (Beckylane), was a finalist for the Edna Staebler Award for creative non-fiction, and what the auntys say (2002), was a finalist for the Gerald Lampert Prize for poetry. Sharron's work appears in several anthologies, including Oxford Anthology of Canadian Native Literature in English, Crisp Blue Edges, Tales from Moccasin Avenue, Double Lives: Writing and Motherhood, and in literary journals, including Gatherings, Yellow Medicine Review and West Coast Line. Sharron has two more recent books, a mixed-genre-historical-fiction called, she walks for days/ inside a thousand eyes/ a two-spirit story (2008), and a book of dedication poems called, she is reading her blanket with her hands (2008). She is currently transcribing the recorded lifestory of Lakota Elder Beverly Little Thunder, who, together with her daughter Lushanya Echeverria, leads the only all-women's Sundance on Turtle Island. The trees are still bending south is Sharron's fifth book.

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