2017 New Year's Resolutions

January 4, 2017

Last year we resolved to expand our reading of new literary voices and while we'll continue that this year, we're making more reading resolutions in 2017. Find out below what each member of team ALU is resolving this year, and which books we missed in 2016 that we're putting straight on top of our 2017 TBR pile.

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Last year we resolved to expand our reading of new literary voices and while we'll continue to keep that up this year, we're making more reading resolutions in 2017. Find out below what each member of team ALU is resolving this year, and which books we missed in 2016 that we're putting straight on top of our 2017 TBR pile.

 

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Christen's Resolution: To write more poetry (which means reading more poetry, all the poetry).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Read: Women and Power: The Case for Parity by Pascale Navarro (Linda Leith Publishers). In 2016, there was much hope for the hardest, highest glass ceiling to be broken in the United States with Hillary Rodham Clinton running for

President. We were collectively and completely shocked that she lost and it was a sharp reminder that there's much more work to be done. In Canada, we have not yet achieved better. Our only female prime minister held power for five months, with no real candidates emerging since. We need gender parity now, in male-dominated industries, in decision-making positions, in highest places everywhere, and especially in our governments. Over a hundred nations worldwide have established quotas to ensure equal political representation. Pascale Navarro makes the argument for this change in today's Canada in Women and Power: The Case for Parity. I look forward to reflecting on these essays and hope they will recharge and inspire many women readers.

 

 

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Tan's Resolution: Attend a reading festival outside the city.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Read: Last year, some of the most interesting books I read were set in northern Canada (That would include the brilliant Search for Heinrich Schlogel, and Ramshackle, a graphic novel about moving to Yellow Knife.) Now that the snow is back, I'm planning to armchair-travel north again with the recently translated Nunavik (Pow Pow Press) by Michel Hellman. It picks up right where his award-winning memoir Mile End left 

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off (the prologue for Nunavik captures the artist's discussion with publisher Luc Bossé about the book, outside a cafe in Mile End) and travels deep into the vast Quebec northern territory. The reviews for the French edition indicate a funny, informative and personal tale with clean, expressive illustrations. Perfect for a bright and snowy afternoon read.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Barb's Resolution: Stop reading the comment section of everything. I start out with good intentions—just a quick peek to see if I need to check myself, or consider how others may feel about something I have strong opinions on—but I inevitably go down the rabbit hole of comments spending shocked hours reading other people's opinions. It seems to me there is no grey left in this world, no way of reconnecting this terrible rent in the fabric of society in which we all seem to have to choose a side…well, you can see how this happens to me. So, for 2017, NO COMMENT SECTIONS and more books.

 

 

 

 

To Read: And with those hours saved not reading the comments, I have been meaning to read Aaron Paquette's   Lightfinder (Kegedonce

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Press) for so long now. 2017 WILL BE THE YEAR!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Lauren's Resolution: My resolution will be to have "books at the table"—when I was growing up, I was consistently admonished by my parents to "take that book off the table!" at family dinner time. As I've grown older, books and conversation have given way to Netflix. In 2017, I'll bring books back to the table and read at dinner, or talk to my partner, I guess (love you, sweetpea).

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Read: I'm hoping to read Angeline Schellenberg's poetry collection  Tell Them It Was Mozart (Brick Books). What promises to be an equally funny

and defiant collection, Schellenberg's range of forms (including Oulipien, a fave) and tender subject matter about a mother raising her child on the autism spectrum make this a book I can't wait to crack into in 2017.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Natasha's Resolution: Read more (if not all 2017) books by women and POC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Read:

The book I'm most keen on reading right away this year is Erin Wunker's Notes From a Feminist Killjoy (BookThug). The male, white, privileged view on life is one we're all intimately familiar with, whether we like it or not…much of our understanding of the world is seen through this lens as it is really the foremost voice seen and heard not only in book publishing, but in other, if not all, media.

I hope that by opening up my consumption of media to more female and other marginalized views, I will grow more not only as a day-to-day person, but also as a feminist who can indeed practice what they preach. A great place to start this year of expansion will be through reading Erin Wunker's book. I look forward to the conversations and ideas it will bring forth to my mind, and also to sharing those views with others, and to own the "Feminist Killjoy" label. 

 

 

 

 

 

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Mandy's Resolution: I don’t read nearly enough short fiction—though last year I did read Nobodies by Chris Gilmore (Now or Never Publishing) and  It Is an Honest Ghost by John Goldbach (Coach House Books)—so my plan is to read more of it this year. Short Story Month? More like Short Story Year.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

To Read: In keeping with my resolution, the first book in my pile for 2017 is Shari Kasman’s Everything Life Has to Offer (Invisible Publishing). 

The stories promise to be hilarious (yes!) and wonderfully whimsical (yes!), and I’m also very curious about this potentially life-changing hot tub and pool of vegan gravy I'm told about. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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